Game 159: BOS vs. NYY — A farewell, a sweep, an elimination

Before tonight’s game, the Yankees said farewell to a long-time rival who played his final game at Yankee Stadium tonight. For the first time in his 20 year career, Yankee Stadium gave David Ortiz a standing ovation as he, and his wife and children, were part of a special pre-game ceremony. The Yankees, represented by former Yankees pitcher David Cone and former Red Sox teammater Jacoby Ellsbury, presented Ortiz with a specially crafted leatherbound book that had memories retold by current and former Yankees. And to present a special painting of Ortiz at the stadium, Mariano Rivera surprised the power-hitter and helped unveil the gift.

Ortiz retires following this current season, but his memories and contributions to the recent rise of the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry are part of history. Not that he contributed much to this particular series, with his 4 strikeouts, 2 walks, and no hits. But his season batting average can afford to take a hit, leaving the game with .316 average.

And they also had a game to play tonight. Only fitting, CC Sabathia got the start, his final start this season, and he did spectacular job. Into the 8th inning, Sabathia threw 105 pitches, gave up just 4 hits, 2 walks, and the lone Red Sox run, and struck out an impressive 8 batters. All this set him up for the inevitable win tonight.

His lone run came in the 4th inning as a 1-out solo home run. The next batter was Ortiz, who walked and when he was replaced with a pinch-runner, and Yankees Stadium gave him his final farewell, a really nice standing ovation.

Anyway, when Sabathia too exited to his own standing ovation, Tyler Clippard came on to close out the 8th inning for Sabathia, using just 7 pitches to breeze through the next 2 outs. And Richard Bleier closed things out quickly in his 12-pitch 9th inning.

Now, for being the AL division champions, the Red Sox certainly haven’t showed such a strength in their final series against the Yankees, especially in regards to their pitching staff. The Yankees paced their way through the game, poking holes in their pitching staff wherever and whenever they could. In the 1st, with 1 out, Ellsbury walked, stole 2nd on a strikeout, and then scored on Starlin Castro’s double to get the Yankees on the board.

With the game tied, the Yankees came back in the 5th with Hicks’ lead-off bunt single. Hicks later scored on Ellsbury’s 2-out double that also saw the end of the Red Sox’s starter’s evening. In the 6th, with 2 outs and the bases loaded, Tyler Austin worked a walk to score the lead runner, and a wild pitch scored the next runner for the extra insurance run.

In the 8th, with 1 out, Brian McCann worked a walk and then scored on Aaron Hicks’ double. Now why that is significant is because McCann, who is arguably one of the slowest guys on the active roster scored from 1st base on a double, like he was one of the faster runners on the team. Then, with another out and a wild pitch, 2 more walks loaded the bases, but the Red Sox wisely pulled that pitcher for another one and closed out the Yankees run-scoring machine this week.

Overall, the Yankees got 8 hits and 7 walks off Red Sox pitchers tonight. Comparatively, the Yankees pitchers only gave up 4 hits and 2 walks. Clearly, the Red Sox weren’t going to win this series. Not with the way they played these last 3 games.

Final score: 5-1 Yankees, Yankees sweep Red Sox 3-0.

However, while it’s great to celebrate their victory, the clubhouse was still rather quiet. The Yankees were officially eliminated from the postseason, despite their win and sweep tonight. It’s still a close race for both wild card races, but the Yankees aren’t in it anymore. The goal every single season is to win a World Series, so that not even making the postseason is heartbreaking.

Now, before you also take out your pitchforks to Girardi, please note that Girardi has actually led his team to a winning season every single season he’s been the Yankees manager. By winning, I mean that they are on the plus side of .500, or they have more wins than losses during the season. But you can’t blame him for how the game has shifted in the last few years. The legends of the 1990s and early 2000s are gone, or retiring this season, and it’s a very different playing field with younger, untested athletes as well as the changing culture of the game.

Remember, the Yankees were supposed to be holding up the bottom of the league or, at best, muddling through the middle by the beginning of September. And yet, it took them until 4 games before the end of the season to end their race for the postseason. While it’s just crushing not be in it, you can’t say it wasn’t a good run, nor can you say the Yankees just gave up.

My mom always loves to say that these guys “just don’t give up”. And she’s right. I don’t expect the next 3 games to be an easy series for the Orioles. Because that’s not who the Yankees are.

Go Yankees!

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